A review of the story tess of the dubervilles

Tess of the d'Urbervilles, title page of the edition Phase the First: Tess is the oldest child of John and Joan Durbeyfield, uneducated peasants.

A review of the story tess of the dubervilles

A bad guy who is fabulously talented in bed and a good guy who fumbles sex can complicate life for a girl. I ought to have my head examined for undertaking a review of Tess of the d'Ubervilles, the next to the last of Thomas Hardy's novels.

My purpose in considering the idea was that I might perhaps persuade one other person to read this novel who might not otherwise.

A review of the story tess of the dubervilles

I am all about service to my fellow man. However, there are strange aspects of this novel that when discussed in remove from the novel itself can make it sound off-putting. I will mention a few of those without emphasizing them. They involve weird twists in the plot handed us through the vehicle of some strange scenes.

On the other hand I do not wish simply to offer diamond-like passages from this novel, although that is tempting. But let us take a shot here.

Tess is the eldest daughter in a poor family in 19th century England. The novel follows events in her life from the time she is sixteen until she is approximately 21, let us say.

There are a multitude of detailed plot outlines of this novel to be found elsewhere on line. The only valuable supplement to those that I can offer is to say bluntly what those plot outlines say in such a roundabout way that it loses impact or can be missed entirely. Tess is one hot looking sixteen-year-old female human being.

It is out of the fact that Tess is one hot looking sixteen-year-old that all the action of this novel arises. At the time of her first seduction, or rape, she is described as one who has a "coarse pattern" laid over her "beautiful feminine tissue.

She is a pretty young girl with that look about her that drives men wild—that look about her being something rarely encountered in a girl so young. I would rather put it this way.

Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy [A Review] – We Need to Talk About Books

When Hardy writes about her when she is in relatively unspoiled natural surroundings, it is apparent that she herself is very much at home in and a natural part of those surroundings.

Hardy places our hot looking sixteen-year-old girl in an environment with some problems. It is an environment wherein the Victorian morals of society are so completely at odds with the nature of men and women generally, and particularly in the realm of sex.

Second, she inhabits a rural area of England where the quality of life is slowly deteriorating. Hardy does not impose upon us with some heavy-handed social commentary at all. Rather, this social commentary is portrayed seamlessly along with the characters and the action.

As an example, there is a great contrast between the portrayal of Tess's life as a milkmaid early in the novel, which is idyllic and almost lyrically described, and her life later in hard labor on a farm, the slave of a threshing machine.

You must notice stuff like this if you are going to do big time literature. But let me get back to the sex because I know that is what probably piqued your interest. For women heterosexual sex requires men, as much as women may at times regret this.

Meanwhile, Tess, his eldest daughter, joins the other village girls in the May Day dance, where Tess briefly exchanges glances with a young man. Mr. Durbeyfield and his wife decide to send Tess to the d’Urberville mansion, where they hope Mrs. d’Urberville will make Tess’s fortune. Tess, the lead character in Tess of the D’Urbervilles, is a beautiful farm girl whose lower class status is denied by her father who fancies that his family are descendants of the old, aristocratic, D’Urberville family. She is sent to work for an old, matriarch and her ne’er-do-well son, Alec, of the D’Urberville family. A&E's movie was truer to the book than Roman Polanski's otherwise excellent and recommendable version, including the situation that sends Tess to the Stoke-D'Urbervilles in the first place. And Oliver Milburn's portrayal of Angel Clare seems to fit the character in the .

Hardy supplies the men here in the form of two male knotheads named Alec and Angel. She is raped by the wealthy Alec who drugged her with a delicious strawberry, and has his child, which immediately dies.

She falls in love with the decent Angel who lacks wits but is under the mistaken impression that he has them in spades.

A review of the story tess of the dubervilles

She marries Angel, only to be abandoned by him when he finds out about her past. She becomes Alec's mistress--Alec now, ala Roman Polanski, regrets the strawberry drugging and the rape--partly for economic reasons. A girl's gotta eat. The other part of her reasons are addressed below. A repentant Angel flies back to her, a tad late to the dance as usual, only after she has just murdered Alec.

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The two of them end up at Stonehenge of all places, where she is apprehended after the police let her complete a nap. There are a lot of puzzling sleep episodes in this novel.

Again, you must notice stuff like that if you are going to do big time literature. I think that we can safely conclude that Alec, the "bad guy," is sexually skillful in the sack. He knows what he is doing with a woman and likes to do it a lot.Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy [A Review] Tess of the D’Urbervilles is the story of a young woman from a poor family, objectified, harassed and pursued .

Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy My rating: 2 of 5 stars This classic novel should subtitled, in my opinion, as “A Tale of Three Bad Men”.

From the SparkNotes Blog

It’s not entirely fair to consider a book written nearly years ago from a modernist point of view (or post-modernist if you will). Tess of the d'Urbervilles, a new adaptation for the stage with five actors was produced in London by Myriad Theatre & Film.

Tess, a new rock opera is an official Next Link Selection at the New York Musical Theatre Festival with music, lyrics, and libretto by Annie Pasqua and Jenna Pasqua. A&E's movie was truer to the book than Roman Polanski's otherwise excellent and recommendable version, including the situation that sends Tess to the Stoke-D'Urbervilles in the first place.

And Oliver Milburn's portrayal of Angel Clare seems to fit the character in the . Tess, the lead character in Tess of the D’Urbervilles, is a beautiful farm girl whose lower class status is denied by her father who fancies that his family are descendants of the old, aristocratic, D’Urberville family.

She is sent to work for an old, matriarch and her ne’er-do-well son, Alec, of the D’Urberville family. Tess of The D’Urbervilles, Thomas Hardy Tess of the d'Urbervilles: A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented is a novel by Thomas Hardy.

It initially appeared in a censored and serialised version, published by the British illustrated newspaper The Graphic in and in book form in /5(K).

SparkNotes: Tess of the d’Urbervilles: Plot Overview