The patterns of social relations the feminist theory symbolic interaction and rational choice theory

Distinguish macro approaches in sociology from micro approaches. Summarize the most important beliefs and assumptions of functionalism and conflict theory. Summarize the most important beliefs and assumptions of symbolic interactionism and exchange theory.

The patterns of social relations the feminist theory symbolic interaction and rational choice theory

The Sociological Perspective This section of the course introduces students to the discipline of sociology, focusing on its history, the questions and scientific methods that characterize it as a field, and what distinguishes it from other social science disciplines.

The patterns of social relations the feminist theory symbolic interaction and rational choice theory

Included in this definition is the ongoing evolution of sociology as a discipline that is both basic science and applied science. Important in this perspective are the elements of sociological practice and possible careers in sociology at all levels of academic preparation.

The first two units of the course introduce students to the dynamic interplay between theory and the logic of the scientific method in sociology. Learners will become aware of the core theoretical perspectives and the process of developing theory.

They will recognize that sociology is a science: The history of sociology is grounded in social and ideological changes in Western Europe and America, specifically the Enlightenment and American pragmatism. Contributions of classical sociological theorists such as Durkheim, Marx, and Weber are examined in combination with major scholars prominent in the emergence of American sociology.

Knowledge Base

Sociological theory attempts to explain in a coherent manner the varieties of societal organization and of social behaviors. Students should understand that though it is posed at an abstract level, sociological theory is continually being refined as it is made to confront empirical reality.

Students should become familiar with the major sociological approaches --functionalism, conflict theory, symbolic interactionism, exchange theory, and feminist theory -- to the explanation of social life. With functionalism Durkheim, Parsonsstudents should be aware of the analogy of society to an organism, the assumption of consensus that underlies social life, and ways that society organizes itself to sanction deviance so that it may return to equilibrium.

Students should also be aware of the criticisms of functionalism regarding its difficulty in dealing with social change. Conflict theory Marx, Weber introduces students to the notion that societal stability may come from stable power relations rather than from an underlying consensus.

Students should become aware of the multiplicity of conflicting interests in society as well as how changes in resources may, among other factors, lead to major social change.

The difficulty of conflict theory in predicting precisely where the fissures in a given society are and when they may erupt is a recurring criticism. An inductive, qualitative approach to the understanding of individual and group interaction in a variety of contexts is the common orientation of symbolic interactionists.

Exchange theory Blau, Homans, Coleman brings issues of rational choice to the fore. Students should understand the ways in which relationships of trust and power may develop as people pursue their self-interest. The degree to which exchange theory is relevant largely to interactions among individuals rather than groups and is contextually based in the larger culture should be understood.

Feminist theory Gilman, Rossi, Millett focuses on the ways that gender systems structure our daily interactions as well as larger systems of power in society. Many feminist theorists focus not only on how patriarchal societies are set up in ways that disadvantage women but on how the effects of patriarchy articulate with other systems of domination, such as class- and race-based domination.

Crossing the No Cry Zone: Psychotherapy With Men by Fredric E. Rabinowitz, Ph.D. It resembles postmodern critical theory, critical postmodernismand the post-Marxism of Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe.

From theories of sexual politics to sociobiology to economic and materialist approaches, feminist theory provides a variety of perspectives on relations of power in society.

Feminist theories differ radically in how they incorporate other approaches to the study of social life. Research Methods Learners will connect the use and construction of theory with the application of diverse research methods to answer sociological questions.We have moved!

Sociological Research Online (SRO) is now published by the BSA and SAGE, and as of August this site will no longer be active. The journal homepage, latest updates, and all issues (including issue onwards) are available on the SAGE Journals ashio-midori.com you are based outside of an academic institution, please contact the Editorial Office for information on free access to.

The 50 Most Influential Psychologists in the World 1. John R. Anderson | Cognitive Psychology. Anderson was born in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, in He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of British Columbia in , and his PhD in psychology from Stanford University in Symbolic interactionism proposes a social theory of the self, or a looking glass self.

Symbolic interactionists study meaning and communication; they tend to use qualitative methods. Symbolic interactionism has been criticized for failing to take into account . Bookmark. College–Level Sociology Curriculum For Introduction to Sociology. Prepared by the American Sociological Association Task Force on a College Level Introduction to Sociology Course.

The Course * Summary Course Outline * Course Narrative. The Course. Purpose: The College-Level Sociology course is designed to introduce students to the sociological study of society. According to rational choice theory, increasing awareness of the costs of committing deviant acts should decrease deviance.

Learning Objectives

Symbolic interaction theory states those meanings people are social to survive and produce offspring interaction breeds conflict, and conflict underlies all social relations.

include symbolic interaction theory and the dramaturgic approach (Chap. 5), phenomenological sociology and ethnomethodology (Chap. 6), and social exchange and rational choice theories (Chap.

7).

Sociological Research Online: Journal Index