Writing a historical narrative ks2 past

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Writing a historical narrative ks2 past

Some of these are made up based on exam board question styles.

writing a historical narrative ks2 past

Two include notes on what the examiners are looking for. How does Golding present violence in Lord of the Flies? The ending of Lord of the Flies is shocking. How is this built up and why is it so effective? Write about the importance of two of the following relationships in Lord of the Flies: Ralph; Jack; Simon; Roger; the twins, the littleuns and the choir etc.

How does Golding use this to prepare the reader for what is to come in the novel? You can do this question for any key scene: How does Golding use the events of Lord of the Flies to get a message across about fascism [or civilization, or the nature of evil]?

How does Golding present his ideas in [any extract], and how are these ideas developed in the rest of the novel? How does Golding present death in Lord of the Flies? AO1 Details of the human deaths the boy with the birthmark, Piggy and Simon; also the airman ; may also discuss the pig hunts The way different boys react to the deaths The ways readers may respond shock, pity What the deaths represent in the novel AO2 The structural patterns associated with the deaths — the progression of intent The language used to describe the deaths and their aftermaths: Write about the importance of these places and how Golding presents them.

This is a very evil question! You can also practise it for various key objects in the novel glasses, conch, fire, uniforms - and talk about their symbolism, and the symbolism of their neglect, degradation and destruction.

Answer may include discussion of: The uses the boys make of the different settings and their relationship with them: Jack and Simon differently in the forest; Jack and Roger at Castle Rock AO2 How the focus of the novel moves from the beach to the jungle and rock, and back again to the beach The language and techniques used to present different places: Jack, knowing this was the crisis, charged too.

The rock struck Piggy a glancing blow from chin to knee; the conch exploded into a thousand white fragments and ceased to exist.

Piggy, saying nothing, with no time for even a grunt, traveled through the air sideways from the rock, turning over as he went. Piggy fell forty feet and landed on his back across that square red rock in the sea. Then the sea breathed again in a long, slow sigh, the water boiled white and pink over the rock; and when it went, sucking back again, the body of Piggy was gone.

Either 3 a Or 3 b How does Golding make this such a powerful and significant moment in the novel? Remember to support your ideas with details from the novel.

Piggy lost his temper. How does Golding make Roger such a horrifying figure?How to Write a Historical Narrative Telling the story of a historical time or event through a narrative allows you to convey information in a format which is more appealing to those who struggle with textbook-style learning.

This is bound to get the football fans in your class interested in history and writing! This is aimed at upper ks1 and lower ks2!

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A intriguing mystery story that integrates coordinates with a narrative and history all at the same time. Brilliant for a topic starter! Very cross curricular!

Two criminals plan a great train robbery. A great opportunity for your children to write some inspiring narrative. How could this be used in your KS1/KS2 Classroom?

– Allow the children to create setting descriptions. – Write the blurb of the story.-Write the next robbery the duo commit at another location. ANGEL A (15) FRANCE BESSON, LUC DVD - £ BLU RAY - £ Looking to escape his past Andre accepts the help of the mysterious Angela and sets in motion a chain of events that will change his life forever.

For Maths tests children require: A pen and pencil. A ruler displaying both cm and mm. An "angle measurer" (protractor). A mirror. Tracing paper. Where a calculator is . Cox Report English for ages 5 to [page 4] Programmes of study. 8 The purpose of programmes of study is to establish the matters, skills and processes which pupils should be taught in order to achieve the attainment targets.

KS2 Story Writing Primary Resources, Creative Writing